Tithing Myth #1: “Tithing is an Eternal Principle”

Some people claim that tithing is an eternal principle because Abraham gave one-tenth to Melchizedek before the Law of Moses.

People who follow this line of reasoning are inconsistent in their application of Scripture, because Abraham also sacrificed animals and kept the law of physical circumcision before the Law of Moses.

Does this mean that sacrificing animals and practicing physical circumcision are eternal principles which remain in effect in the New Covenant? No. Are believers required to sacrifice animals and practice physical circumcision just because Abraham practiced both of these things before the Law of Moses? No.

Animal sacrifices and the law of physical circumcision were brought to an end at Christ’s crucifixion, when the New Covenant was instituted by God through Jesus’ shed blood.

Just because the patriarchs practiced something before the Law of Moses doesn’t mean that it’s an eternal principle binding upon believers for all time. The patriarchs practiced many things that aren’t part of the New Covenant.

The phrase “eternal principle” means that a principle or law that God requires in all time periods, in all places, of all people. For example, “you shall not murder” is an eternal principle because all people, in all places, in all time periods are forbidden from taking innocent life. The same thing cannot be said of tithing.

God never required all people, in all places, at all times to tithe. God didn’t require anyone to tithe before the Old Covenant. And even during the Old Covenant, not all people were required to tithe (for example: Gentiles, the poor, widows, orphans, and people who weren’t farmers and shepherds weren’t required to tithe). This shows that tithing isn’t an “eternal principle.”

Even if we were to entertain the idea that tithing is an eternal principle, people who believe in tithing aren’t adhering to the tithing laws that God commanded in Scripture. They’re practicing a man-made tradition of monetary-tithing which developed after the original apostles died. So even if we go along with the idea that “tithing is an eternal principle,” it simply creates another problem which is. . . why isn’t anyone practicing tithing in the specific manner that God commanded in Scripture?

At any rate, Abraham’s tithe to Melchizedek doesn’t prove that tithing is an eternal principle, because God didn’t command Abraham to tithe to anyone and tithing wasn’t part of Abraham’s covenant with God. As believers in Jesus Christ, we don’t base our beliefs and practices on what Abraham did before the Law of Moses. We base our beliefs and practices on the full counsel of Scripture rightly divided through the illuminating light of Jesus Christ and the New Covenant.

The Ten Commandments and the Egyptian Book of the Dead – Part 1 [The Introduction]

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In this series, I will be spending some time refuting the assertion that the ten commandments originated from the Egyptian Book of the Dead–more specifically, from the Negative Confession in the Papyrus of Ani.

Some of you might remember that I addressed this assertion on my Spreaker podcast back in December of 2016, but I thought that it would be beneficial to present my refutation in written format as well.

One of the issues of concern in the body of Christ today is the barrage of misinformation being spread on the internet, and offline, asserting that Jesus Christ, the Gospel, the Old and New Testament, and the Christian Faith all contain pagan elements which were allegedly derived from ancient Egyptian mythology, whether through plagiarism or influence.

A number of false claims are made in an attempt to substantiate this false assertion. For example, you might have heard someone claim that Jesus is a pagan copy of Horus, or maybe you have seen a meme or video on social media claiming that the Biblical term “amen” comes from the name of the ancient Egyptian mythological god, Amun-Ra.

These claims, among many others, are regurgitated mainly by individuals who ascribe to secular humanism, New Age philosophy, occult metaphysics, neopaganism, the Kemetic religion and other forms of alternative African spirituality.

It’s apparent to me that the agenda behind this promotion of unhistorical propaganda is to invalidate and discredit the Old and New Testament and dissuade professing Christians from believing what the 66 books of the Bible teach–namely that the Old and New Testament are the God-breathed authoritative word of God, that Jesus Christ is God manifested in the flesh and the only Savior of mankind, and the Gospel is the Good News message of salvation.

Tragically, this agenda has played a role in seducing many professing Christians away from Jesus Christ, away from the Holy Scriptures, and away from the Christian Faith.

My hope is that more and more believers will see the urgent need to get equipped with sound doctrine, with knowledge of how we received the Old and New Testament, with knowledge of Church history and world history (especially African history), and gain the courage, compassion, and zeal to engage individuals who have been taken in by unhistorical misinformation.

To this end, the purpose of this article is threefold:

1. To briefly explain the origins of the false assertion that Jesus Christ, the Gospel, the Old and New Testament, and the Christian Faith all contain pagan elements which were allegedly derived from ancient Egyptian mythology.

2. To refute one specific false claim–the claim that the ten commandments originated from the Egyptian Book of the Dead.

3. To explain why the Egyptian Book of the Dead actually demonstrates man’s need for a Savior and the necessity of Christ’s redemptive work on the Cross and the Gospel message.

Did The Name “Israel” Come From Isis-Ra-El? [Kemet]

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1000509261001_2152013861001_History-Coroners-Report-King-Tut-SF-HD-768x432-16x9Over the years, I have observed a rise in the belief that Jesus Christ, the Gospel message, the Old and the New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith derived from ancient mythology and ancient pagan religions.

The purpose of this belief is to disparage and disprove Jesus Christ, the Gospel message, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith.

The ultimate goal is to discourage professing Christians from believing in Jesus Christ, the Gospel, and the Holy Scriptures, and lure them away from the Christian Faith.

This belief is promoted online typically by individuals who ascribe to secular humanism, New Age philosophy, occult metaphysics, Neo-Paganism, and various forms of “African spirituality” or Afrocentric Neo-Paganism (especially Kemetism, also referred to as “Kemeticism” or “Neterism”).

The purpose of this article is to refute one of the many misleading assertions that are spread on the internet to advance this idea that Jesus Christ, the Gospel message, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith derived from ancient mythology and ancient pagan religions.

This particular assertion states that the name “Israel” derived from a combination of the names “Isis,” “Ra,” and “El.”

Maybe you’ve seen it promoted in images like the one below:

11873538_740873769392754_8484022432474100592_nI’ve actually encountered quite a few people who claimed that the letters “I-s” in Israel came from “Isis” (the name of an ancient Egyptian goddess), and the letters “r-a” in Israel came from “Ra” (the name of an ancient Egyptian false god).

This assertion might sound compelling at first glance, but it’s easily demolished by applying a little logic and critical-thinking skills.

The line of reasoning behind this assertion is that since there’s an “is” in both “Israel” and “Isis” — then these two names must be related to each other, and the name “Israel” must have come from the name “Isis.”

This line of reasoning is flawed for two reasons.

  1. Just because two words contain the letters “i-s,” that doesn’t mean they are related to each other and derived from the name “Isis.”

For example, the name “Mississippi” has an “is” in it. Does this mean that the name “Mississippi” is related to and derived from the name “Isis”? Of course not.

The name “Mississippi” came from the word “Messipi,” which is the French rendering of the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe or Algonquin) name for the river, “Misi-ziibi” (meaning “Great River”).

The word “is” has the letters “i-s” in it as well. Does that mean the word “is” is related to and derived from the name “Isis”? Nope.

If you’ve ever taught or studied Language Arts, then you know that just because two words contain the same letters, that doesn’t mean they are related to each other or that one derived from the other.

2. The name “Isis” is an English word. It is the English rendering of the Greek name “Aisis” which is Greek for “Aset” (the Egyptian name spelling of Isis).

The English name “Isis” obviously didn’t exist at the time of Jacob when God named him named Yisrael. So it is erroneous to state that the ancient Hebrew name “Yisrael” came from an English word when the English language didn’t even exist at that time.

Did The “r-a” in Israel Come From The Name Of The Ancient Egyptian Idol “Ra”?

horus-egypt-godNo.

There is no historical evidence to substantiate the belief that the “r-a” in Israel came from the name “Ra.” Zero proof. None. Zip. Zilch. Nada.

Just because two words contain the letters “ra,” that doesn’t mean they are related to each other or derived from the name “Ra.”

The word “ran” contains the letters “ra.” Does that mean the word “ran” is related to or derived from the name “Ra”? Of course not. The word “ran” is the past tense of the word “run.”

The “ra” in Israel comes from the same primitive root as the “ra” in Sarah’s name — meaning “to contend, have power, contend with, persist, exert oneself, persevere, to prevail, to have power (as a prince).” (Strong’s Hebrew Lexicon H8280)

The “el” in Israel is the shortened form of “elohim” which has multiple meanings depending on the context: “God Almighty, god-like one, mighty one, mighty men, men of rank, mighty heroes, angel, false god, (demons, imaginations), mighty things in nature, strength, power.” (Strong’s Hebrew Lexicon H3478)

The connection between the name “Israel” and ancient Egyptian idols is imaginary and mythical. It doesn’t exist. People are making things up as they go and creating false connections based on a presupposition that the Christian Faith originated from ancient Egyptian mythology.

Followers of Kemet are attempting to cash in on phonetic similarities without philological justifications for it. And based on an English transliteration at that. Kinda New Agey.

The patriarch Jacob and his progeny did live in Egypt. However, God had already named him Yisrael long before he moved to Egypt.

There is some debate over the exact meaning of the name Israel. However, one thing is safe to conclude from both Biblical history and the secular historical record — the name Israel did not come from the names of ancient Egyptian idols.

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