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Did The Name “Israel” Come From Isis-Ra-El? [Kemet]

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1000509261001_2152013861001_History-Coroners-Report-King-Tut-SF-HD-768x432-16x9Over the years, I have observed a rise in the belief that Jesus Christ, the Gospel message, the Old and the New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith derived from ancient mythology and ancient pagan religions.

The purpose of this belief is to disparage and disprove Jesus Christ, the Gospel message, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith.

The ultimate goal is to discourage professing Christians from believing in Jesus Christ, the Gospel, and the Holy Scriptures, and lure them away from the Christian Faith.

This belief is promoted online typically by individuals who ascribe to secular humanism, New Age philosophy, occult metaphysics, Neo-Paganism, and various forms of “African spirituality” or Afrocentric Neo-Paganism (especially Kemetism, also referred to as “Kemeticism” or “Neterism”).

The purpose of this article is to refute one of the many misleading assertions that are spread on the internet to advance this idea that Jesus Christ, the Gospel message, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith derived from ancient mythology and ancient pagan religions.

This particular assertion states that the name “Israel” derived from a combination of the names “Isis,” “Ra,” and “El.”

Maybe you’ve seen it promoted in images like the one below:

11873538_740873769392754_8484022432474100592_nI’ve actually encountered quite a few people who claimed that the letters “I-s” in Israel came from “Isis” (the name of an ancient Egyptian goddess), and the letters “r-a” in Israel came from “Ra” (the name of an ancient Egyptian false god).

This assertion might sound compelling at first glance, but it’s easily demolished by applying a little logic and critical-thinking skills.

The line of reasoning behind this assertion is that since there’s an “is” in both “Israel” and “Isis” — then these two names must be related to each other, and the name “Israel” must have come from the name “Isis.”

This line of reasoning is flawed for two reasons.

  1. Just because two words contain the letters “i-s,” that doesn’t mean they are related to each other and derived from the name “Isis.”

For example, the name “Mississippi” has an “is” in it. Does this mean that the name “Mississippi” is related to and derived from the name “Isis”? Of course not.

The name “Mississippi” came from the word “Messipi,” which is the French rendering of the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe or Algonquin) name for the river, “Misi-ziibi” (meaning “Great River”).

The word “is” has the letters “i-s” in it as well. Does that mean the word “is” is related to and derived from the name “Isis”? Nope.

If you’ve ever taught or studied Language Arts, then you know that just because two words contain the same letters, that doesn’t mean they are related to each other or that one derived from the other.

2. The name “Isis” is an English word. It is the English rendering of the Greek name “Aisis” which is Greek for “Aset” (the Egyptian name spelling of Isis).

The English name “Isis” obviously didn’t exist at the time of Jacob when God named him named Yisrael. So it is erroneous to state that the ancient Hebrew name “Yisrael” came from an English word when the English language didn’t even exist at that time.

Did The “r-a” in Israel Come From The Name Of The Ancient Egyptian Idol “Ra”?

horus-egypt-godNo.

There is no historical evidence to substantiate the belief that the “r-a” in Israel came from the name “Ra.” Zero proof. None. Zip. Zilch. Nada.

Just because two words contain the letters “ra,” that doesn’t mean they are related to each other or derived from the name “Ra.”

The word “ran” contains the letters “ra.” Does that mean the word “ran” is related to or derived from the name “Ra”? Of course not. The word “ran” is the past tense of the word “run.”

The “ra” in Israel comes from the same primitive root as the “ra” in Sarah’s name — meaning “to contend, have power, contend with, persist, exert oneself, persevere, to prevail, to have power (as a prince).” (Strong’s Hebrew Lexicon H8280)

The “el” in Israel is the shortened form of “elohim” which has multiple meanings depending on the context: “God Almighty, god-like one, mighty one, mighty men, men of rank, mighty heroes, angel, false god, (demons, imaginations), mighty things in nature, strength, power.” (Strong’s Hebrew Lexicon H3478)

The connection between the name “Israel” and ancient Egyptian idols is imaginary and mythical. It doesn’t exist. People are making things up as they go and creating false connections based on a presupposition that the Christian Faith originated from ancient Egyptian mythology.

Followers of Kemet are attempting to cash in on phonetic similarities without philological justifications for it. And based on an English transliteration at that. Kinda New Agey.

The patriarch Jacob and his progeny did live in Egypt. However, God had already named him Yisrael long before he moved to Egypt.

There is some debate over the exact meaning of the name Israel. However, one thing is safe to conclude from both Biblical history and the secular historical record — the name Israel did not come from the names of ancient Egyptian idols.

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T.D. Jakes, Civil Rights Opportunists, & #CertainBlackLivesMatter

Earlier today, I was tagged on a Huffington Post article titled “Bishop T.D. Jakes May Be The Healer America Needs Right Now.”

In fulfillment of prophecy (Matthew 24:5), the world continues to lift up false messiahs as “the healer” “the visionary” “the one” and “the man of peace.” But hopefully, the true body of Christ knows better.

The article mentioned a “Black Lives Matter” prayer delivered by Jakes in December of 2014. The prayer can be heard in the YouTube video below.

Well, this is all very Twilight Zonish to me considering that Jakes financially exploits Black people (especially women) with emotion-stroking Scriptural gymnastics and a poisonous blend of Word-Faith heresy, ‘self-empowerment,’ and New Age philosophy.

But now all of a sudden, “Black Lives Matter”?

It’s bizarre to see Jakes taking interest in the “Black Lives Matter” Movement, because I remember during the Eddie Long scandal, Jakes minimized the egregious nature of the allegations by saying that if the allegations were true, Long’s accusers were “old enough to drive” “old enough to make their own decisions” and “old enough to go to war” at the time the alleged sexual abuse occurred — as if that somehow made it OKAY for a married ‘bishop’ to use his perceived authority, power, and wealth to allegedly coerce teenage boys into sexual acts and relationships for his own personal gratification.

Jakes also said that it wasn’t like the alleged victims were 10-years-old — as if sexual abuse is “less harmful” for teenage boys than 10-year-old boys. You can watch the CNN interview with Jakes by clicking here.

eddie long and td jakes

Speaking for myself, Jakes’ response to the allegations of sexual abuse against Eddie Long angered me and raised a huge red flag.

His response was representative of the widespread negligence, apathy, indifference, and concealment of child sexual abuse within the black ‘community.’

The general mindset towards the sexual abuse of children seems to be that children don’t have the right to be innocent, sexually pure, safe and protected.

Within the black ‘community,’ this mindset is even more predominant due to the hyper-sexualization of black youth and the myth that black children are innately “more sexual” than other children.

Black children are taught (often by their own relatives) that:

-They do not have any personal space, a personal bubble, or personal boundaries that can be trespassed or intruded upon.

-It’s okay for people to view and touch their private parts.

-It’s okay for them to view and touch the private parts of others.

-It’s okay for adults to make comments about their private parts.

-It’s okay for adults (including relatives) to make creepy, disturbing, and inappropriate comments like “you’re going to be sexy when you get older” “I’m coming for you when you turn 18” and to view these comments as “harmless compliments.”

-It’s okay for them to see adults being sexual.

-They don’t have the right to say “no” to uncomfortable or inappropriate touching.

-Not to take uncomfortable or inappropriate touching seriously (but to see it as someone “joking around” being “playful” or being “very affectionate”).

-To perform inappropriate and sexual acts to or in the presence of older siblings, cousins, and adults.

-To see themselves, from a very early age, as sex objects.

-Black girls are taught that they are “stuck up” “rude” or the “b” word if they reject sexual attention from random Black adult males.

-Black girls are also taught at a very early age, to be sexually subservient to black adult males.

In some families, child sexual abuse is a “rite of passage.” Horror stories of being raped, molested, and verbally, emotionally, and psychologically violated by predators are common.

When some black children act out sexually, their behavior is brushed off as “being fast” “rebellious” or “that’s just how kids are today.”

Rarely does anyone see their behavior as a cry for help, indicative of a deeper problem, and ask questions and investigate WHY they are acting out sexually. This goes back to black children being seen as hyper-sexual or innately “more sexual” than other children.

When you combine these ingredients with the dangerous almost cult-like adulation and exaltation of “the black preacher” and the excessive authority that many of them are given, it creates a climate where sexual predators are given carte blanche to molest and rape black children.

the man of God syndrome

Woe betide the courageous victim who comes forward and tells their story. They will be bashed to the ends of the earth and falsely accused of lying, slandering the man of God, touching God’s anointed, seducing their perpetrator, being a willing participant, wanting it, and “being fast.”

Those who do believe the victim often tell them to keep quiet, don’t tell the police, don’t get a lawyer, just pray, forgive, and move on. “Let the church/denomination handle it internally” which means let the church do nothing and brush it under the rug.

The lives of black men and women who are unjustly killed SHOULD matter. But so should the lives of black children who are sexually abused.

I give a BIG side-eye to those who demonstrate selective outrage and concern when men are killed, but dogmatically state we have “no authority” to speak on child sexual abuse and that we should “just pray and plead the blood” (which is churchanese code language for “shut up and stop snitching”).

Maybe instead of‪#‎BlackLivesMatter‬ the hashtag should be ‪#‎CertainBlackLivesMatter .

Both T.D. Jakes and Jamal Harrison-Bryant can have several pews.

“You shall do no injustice in judgment; you shall not be partial to the poor nor defer to the great, but you are to judge your neighbor fairly.” (Leviticus 19:15)

“Defend the weak and the fatherless; uphold the cause of the poor and the oppressed.” (Psalm 82:3)

Did The Ten Commandments Come From The Ancient Egyptian Book Of The Dead?

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If this is your first time here, please read the comment policy so that you understand the guidelines for commenting here.

opening-of-the-mouth-ceremony-1

Over the years, I have observed a rise in the belief that Jesus Christ, the Gospel, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith were plagiarized from ancient Egyptian mythology.

A number of claims are made in an attempt to substantiate this belief. For example:

“Jesus is a pagan copy of Horus”

“The 10 commandments came from the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead [also called the 42 Principles of Ma’at]”

“The stories of the Bible were borrowed from Kemet” [the term “Kemet” is the name of ancient Egypt in Egyptian]

Many other assertions are made, but the overarching belief is that the Christian Faith is a stolen religion which evolved out of ancient Egyptian mythology.

This belief is disseminated online mainly by individuals who ascribe to secular humanism, New Age philosophy, occult metaphysics, Kemetic [Egyptian] religion, and other forms of alternative African spirituality.

The purpose of this belief is to invalidate and discredit our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, the Gospel, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the Christian Faith.

The aim is to dissuade professing Christians from believing in Jesus Christ, the Gospel, and the Holy Scriptures, and ultimately lure them away from the Christian Faith.

Where Does This Belief Come From? What Is Its Origin?

The belief that Jesus, the Gospel, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the authentic Christian Faith were plagiarized from ancient Egyptian mythology doesn’t trace back to one sole origin, source, or founder.

Instead, it is a converging blend of theories from various Western European authors dating back to the late 18th century. The most influential theory being the Christ myth theory which you can read about by clicking here.

The materials below are often-cited as “historical documentation” and “factual support:”

-The Anacalypsis by Godfrey Higgins

-The World’s Sixteen Crucified Saviors (or Christianity Before Christ) by Kersey Graves

-The Christ Conspiracy: The Greatest Story Ever Sold by Acharya S

-Suns of God: Krishna, Buddha and Christ Unveiled by Acharya S

-Christ in Egypt: The Horus-Jesus Connection by Acharya S

-Ancient Egypt: The Light of the World (Gerald Massey)

-Christianity Before Christ by John G. Jackson

-Zeitgeist: The Movie

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Many of the assertions that were made in these materials have been debunked and dismantled by historians, Bible scholars, Egyptologists, Christians and nonChristians alike.

But unfortunately, many others have swallowed these assertions hook, line, and sinker and pass them on as if they’re the absolute truth.

While there may be some inconsequential similarities between ancient Egyptian mythology and the Christian Faith — these inconsequential similarities are overshadowed by fundamental differences between ancient Egyptian mythology and the teachings of Jesus Christ.

When I compare the teachings of Jesus Christ to ancient Egyptian mythology on some of the most important theological subjects, such as: the origin of all life, the nature of God, the nature of man, God’s relationship to man, the worship of God, death and the afterlife — I find that the two are drastically different and in many cases, diametrically-opposed to one another.

When it comes to life’s biggest questions, ancient Egyptian mythological beliefs are at odds with the Lord Jesus Christ and His teaching.

Instead of finding significant parallels, theological harmony, and striking similarities — I find stark contrasts, conflicts, and incongruity.

As such, the belief that Jesus, the Gospel, the Old and New Testament Scriptures, and the authentic Christian Faith were plagiarized from ancient Egyptian mythology is baseless, utterly absurd, and without merit.

From time to time, I will be posting articles and podcasts dismantling this belief.

The podcast below dismantles the false assertion that the 10 commandments originated from the Egyptian Book of the Dead.